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Occlusion-Resistant Camera Design for Acquisition of Active Environments Daniel G. Aliaga Yi Xu Voicu Popescu
 

Summary: Occlusion-Resistant Camera Design for Acquisition of Active Environments
Daniel G. Aliaga Yi Xu Voicu Popescu
aliaga@cs.purdue.edu xu43@cs.purdue.edu popescu@cs.purdue.edu
Department of Computer Science
Purdue University
Abstract
We propose a family of Occlusion-Resistant Camera (ORC) designs for acquiring active environments despite the presence
of moving interfering occluders. Being able to capture images in an in-use environment increases acquisition efficiency and
quality without having to close-off the targeted site. Our cameras explicitly remove interfering dynamic occluders from acquired
data in real-time and during live capture. Our key idea is to capture the scene at least twice from each viewpoint as the camera
moves continually to sweep the scene and sample all surfaces. Our approach creates a single portable device combining the
benefits of a stationary camera, which detects moving interfering occluders by image differencing, with those of a dynamic
camera, which achieves scene coverage for inside-looking-out modeling. We describe our family of designs that progressively
trades complexity for stricter camera orientation constraints, analyze their performance, and present a first ORC implementation.
Keywords: acquisition, dynamic, occlusions, automatic, background, light fields.
1. Introduction
Methods in geometric modeling, in image-based rendering, and in computer vision use cameras as light measuring devices to
create models of real-world environments that enable compelling virtual exploration at interactive rates. Passive methods rely
solely on data collected by cameras to build comprehensive databases of rays such as panoramas and light fields [5], or to build
conventional geometric models based on depth estimated from stereo correspondences [10]. Active methods add energy into the

  

Source: Aliaga, Daniel G. - Department of Computer Sciences, Purdue University

 

Collections: Computer Technologies and Information Sciences