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Frog genetics: Xenopus tropicalis jumps into the future ENRIQUE AMAYA, MARTIN F. OFFIELD* AND ROBERT M. GRAINGER*
 

Summary: COMMENT
Frog genetics: Xenopus tropicalis jumps into the future
ENRIQUE AMAYA, MARTIN F. OFFIELD* AND ROBERT M. GRAINGER*
ea3@mole.bio.cam.ac.uk mfo4v@unix.mail.virginia.edu rmg9p@avery.med.virginia.edu
WELLCOME/CRC INSTITUTE, TENNIS COURT ROAD, CAMBRIDGE, UK CB2 1QR.
*DEPARTMENT OF BIOLOGY, UNIVERSITY OF VIRGINIA, GILMER HALL, CHARLOTTESVILLE, VA 22903, USA.
For over a century amphibian embryos
have been one of the favoured sys-
tems for elucidating the mechanisms
of early development1. The two main
reasons for this are that the embryos
develop externally and their relatively
large size allows embryologists to
perform microsurgery and manipu-
late the embryos experimentally in
ways that are not as easy in other ver-
tebrate embryos (e.g. mouse or zebra-
fish). Most of the early experiments
were done on embryos from Rana
(common frog), Triturus (European

  

Source: Amaya, Enrique - Healing Foundation Centre & Developmental Biology, Faculty of Life Sciences, University of Manchester

 

Collections: Biology and Medicine