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Intrinsic Stability of Temporally Shifted Spike-Timing Dependent Plasticity
 

Summary: Intrinsic Stability of Temporally Shifted Spike-Timing
Dependent Plasticity
Baktash Babadi1
*, L. F. Abbott1,2
1 Center for Theoretical Neuroscience, Department of Neuroscience, Columbia University, New York, New York, United States of America, 2 Department of Physiology and
Cellular Biophysics, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York, New York, United States of America
Abstract
Spike-timing dependent plasticity (STDP), a widespread synaptic modification mechanism, is sensitive to correlations between
presynaptic spike trains and it generates competition among synapses. However, STDP has an inherent instability because strong
synapses are more likely to be strengthened than weak ones, causing them to grow in strength until some biophysical limit is
reached. Through simulations and analytic calculations, we show that a small temporal shift in the STDP window that causes
synchronous, or nearly synchronous, pre- and postsynaptic action potentials to induce long-term depression can stabilize
synaptic strengths. Shifted STDP also stabilizes the postsynaptic firing rate and can implement both Hebbian and anti-Hebbian
forms of competitive synaptic plasticity. Interestingly, the overall level of inhibition determines whether plasticity is Hebbian or
anti-Hebbian. Even a random symmetric jitter of a few milliseconds in the STDP window can stabilize synaptic strengths while
retaining these features. The same results hold for a shifted version of the more recent ``triplet'' model of STDP. Our results
indicate that the detailed shape of the STDP window function near the transition from depression to potentiation is of the utmost
importance in determining the consequences of STDP, suggesting that this region warrants further experimental study.
Citation: Babadi B, Abbott LF (2010) Intrinsic Stability of Temporally Shifted Spike-Timing Dependent Plasticity. PLoS Comput Biol 6(11): e1000961. doi:10.1371/
journal.pcbi.1000961

  

Source: Abbott, Laurence - Center for Neurobiology and Behavior & Department of Physiology and Cellular Biophysics, Columbia University

 

Collections: Biology and Medicine