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American Journal of Botany 91(5): 760766. 2004. COMPLEX ORIGINS OF BREADFRUIT (ARTOCARPUS
 

Summary: 760
American Journal of Botany 91(5): 760766. 2004.
COMPLEX ORIGINS OF BREADFRUIT (ARTOCARPUS
ALTILIS, MORACEAE): IMPLICATIONS FOR HUMAN
MIGRATIONS IN OCEANIA1
NYREE J. C. ZEREGA,2,4
DIANE RAGONE,3
AND TIMOTHY J. MOTLEY2
2
The Lewis B. and Dorothy Cullman Program for Plant Molecular Systematic Studies, The New York Botanical Garden, Bronx,
New York 10458 USA; and 3
The National Tropical Botanical Garden, 3530 Papalina Road, Kalaheo, Hawaii 96741 USA
Breadfruit (Artocarpus altilis, Moraceae), a traditional starch crop in Oceania, has enjoyed legendary status ever since its role in
the infamous mutiny aboard the H.M.S. Bounty in 1789, yet its origins remain unclear. Breadfruit's closest relatives are A. camansi
and A. mariannensis. DNA fingerprinting data (AFLP, amplified fragment length polymorphisms) from over 200 breadfruit cultivars,
30 A. camansi, and 24 A. mariannensis individuals were used to investigate the relationships among these species. Multivariate analyses
and the identification of species-specific AFLP markers indicate at least two origins of breadfruit. Most Melanesian and Polynesian
cultivars appear to have arisen over generations of vegetative propagation and selection from A. camansi. In contrast, most Micronesian
breadfruit cultivars appear to be the result of hybridization between A. camansi-derived breadfruit and A. mariannensis. Because
breadfruit depends on humans for dispersal, the data were compared to theories on the human colonization of Oceania. The results

  

Source: Ault, James R. - Chicago Botanic Garden

 

Collections: Biology and Medicine