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2006 The Society for the Study of Evolution. All rights reserved. Evolution, 60(2), 2006, pp. 370382
 

Summary:  370
2006 The Society for the Study of Evolution. All rights reserved.
Evolution, 60(2), 2006, pp. 370382
THE ORIGIN AND DIVERSIFICATION OF GALAPAGOS MOCKINGBIRDS
BRIAN S. ARBOGAST,1,2,3 SERGEI V. DROVETSKI,2,4 ROBERT L. CURRY,5 PETER T. BOAG,6 GILLES SEUTIN,7
PETER R. GRANT,8 B. ROSEMARY GRANT,8 AND DAVID J. ANDERSON3,9
1Department of Biological Sciences, Humboldt State University, Arcata, California 95521
2Department of Zoology and the Burke Museum, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195
3Department of Biology, Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, North Carolina 27109
5Department of Biology, Villanova University, Villanova, Pennsylvania 19085
6Department of Biology, Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario K7L 3N6, Canada
7National Parks Directorate, Parks Canada, Gatineau, Quebec K1A 0M5, Canada
8Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544
9E-mail: da@wfu.edu
Abstract. Evolutionary radiations of colonists on archipelagos provide valuable insight into mechanisms and modes
of speciation. The apparent diversification of Galapagos mockingbirds (Nesomimus) provoked Darwin's initial con-
ception of adaptive radiation, but the monophyly of this historically important exemplar has not been evaluated with
molecular data. Additionally, as with most Galapagos organisms, we have a poor understanding of the temporal pattern
of diversification of the mockingbirds following colonization(s) from source populations. Here we present a molecular
phylogeny of Galapagos and other mockingbird populations based on mitochondrial sequence data. Monophyly of

  

Source: Arbogast, Brian - Department of Biological Sciences, University of North Carolina at Wilmington

 

Collections: Environmental Sciences and Ecology