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Long-Term Ecological Effects of Demographic and Socioeconomic Factors in Wolong Nature
 

Summary: Chapter 10
Long-Term Ecological Effects of Demographic
and Socioeconomic Factors in Wolong Nature
Reserve (China)
Li An, Marc Linderman, Guangming He, Zhiyun Ouyang, and Jianguo Liu
10.1 Introduction
Human population has exerted enormous impacts on biodiversity, even in areas
with "biodiversity hotspots" identified by Myers et al. (2000). For instance, the
population density in 1995 and the population growth rate between 1995 and 2000
in biodiversity hotspots were substantially higher than world averages, suggesting a
high risk of habitat degradation and species extinction (Cincotta et al. 2000). Many
regression models have been built to establish correlated relationships between
biodiversity and population (e.g., Forester and Machlis 1996; Brashares et al. 2001;
Veech 2003; McKee et al. 2004). These models are important and necessary, but
they use aggregate variables such as population size, density, and growth rate,
which may mask the underlying mechanisms of biodiversity loss and could result in
potentially misleading conclusions. For example, does a declining population
growth reduce the impact on biodiversity? Although global population growth
has been slowing down, household growth has been much faster than population
growth (Liu et al. 2003). The continued reduction in household size (i.e., number of

  

Source: An, Li - Department of Geography, San Diego State University

 

Collections: Environmental Sciences and Ecology; Geosciences