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01/10/2002 10:40 AM Enzymology-V. 350 PS111-22.tex PS111-22.xml APserialsv2(2000/12/19) Textures 2.0 380 GENOMICS [22]
 

Summary: 01/10/2002 10:40 AM Enzymology-V. 350 PS111-22.tex PS111-22.xml APserialsv2(2000/12/19) Textures 2.0
380 GENOMICS [22]
[22] Searching Yeast Intron Data at Ares Lab Web Site
By LESLIE GRATE and MANUEL ARES, JR.
Introduction
It must be obvious to every geneticist by now that the future will be consumed
by the need to understand how the elemental properties of genes so elegantly
described in the past half-century come together with the environment to produce
the subtle differences that are key to the fitness of the organism. This will require a
partial abandonment of the reductionism so favored since Mendel, to be replaced by
the adoption of a more synthetic view that addresses the molecular underpinnings
of complex phenotypes, penetrance, expressivity, and the small contributions of
many genes. Although many of us were trained to design experiments about single
genes, or at the most two interacting genes, our students and researchers need
more. More in this case is a healthy computational philosophy and experience.
We have tried to embrace this in our own small way by setting up a searchable
database containing information concerning the introns found in the genome of
Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Since one of us (MA) has training in genes but not
computers, and the other (LG) has training in computers but not genes, this effort
has been a cultural compromise. Despite its lack of sophistication and dotcom

  

Source: Ares Jr., Manny - Department of Molecular, Cell, and Developmental Biology, University of California at Santa Cruz

 

Collections: Biology and Medicine