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A Distributed Approach for Monitoring Multicast Service Availability Kamil Sarac Kevin C. Almeroth
 

Summary: A Distributed Approach for Monitoring Multicast Service Availability
Kamil Sarac Kevin C. Almeroth
Dept of Computer Science Dept of Computer Science
University of Texas at Dallas University of California
Richardson, TX 75083 Santa Barbara, CA 93106
ksarac@utdallas.edu almeroth@cs.ucsb.edu
Abstract
With the deployment of native multicast in commercial networks, multicast is getting closer to becoming a ubiqui-
tous service in the Internet. The success of this deployment largely depends on the availability of good management
tools and systems. One of the most important management tasks for multicast is to verify the availability of the
service to its users. This task is usually referred to as reachability monitoring. Reachability monitoring requires
a number of monitoring stations to work together to collect this information in a distributed manner in the inter-
domain scale.
In this paper we present a general architecture for multicast reachability monitoring systems and focus on three
critical functions: agent configuration, monitoring, and feedback collection. For each component, we provide a
number of alternative approaches to implement the required functionality and discuss their advantages and disad-
vantages. Then, we focus on the feedback collection component. To a large extent, it determines the complexity
and the overhead of a monitoring system. Using simulations, we compare a number of alternative approaches for
feedback collection and make suggestions on when to use each. We believe our work provides insight into the issues
and considerations in designing and developing multicast reachability monitoring systems.

  

Source: Almeroth, Kevin C. - Department of Computer Science, University of California at Santa Barbara

 

Collections: Computer Technologies and Information Sciences