Home

About

Advanced Search

Browse by Discipline

Scientific Societies

E-print Alerts

Add E-prints

E-print Network
FAQHELPSITE MAPCONTACT US


  Advanced Search  

 
EFFECTS OF POLLEN LOAD AND DONOR DIVERSITY ON SEED AND FRUIT MASS IN THE COLUMNAR CACTUS, PACHYCEREUS SCHOTTII (CACTACEAE)
 

Summary: EFFECTS OF POLLEN LOAD AND DONOR DIVERSITY ON SEED AND FRUIT MASS
IN THE COLUMNAR CACTUS, PACHYCEREUS SCHOTTII (CACTACEAE)
J. Nathaniel Holland,1
Scott A. Chamberlain, Aline M. Waguespack, and Anthony S. Kinyo
Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Rice University, MS-170, Houston, Texas 77005, U.S.A.
As seed and fruit size can influence the success of later life history stages, it is important to understand their
sources of variation. In this study, we examined the effects of pollen load and donor diversity on variation in seed
and fruit mass of outcrossing senita cacti (Pachycereus schottii) in the Sonoran Desert. By massing all individual
seeds per fruit from pollen supplementation and donor diversity experiments, we were able to examine their
effects on seed and fruit mass, compared with intra- and interplant variation. Seed and fruit mass showed up to 13-
and 15-fold variations, respectively. Pollen load did statistically increase seed and fruit mass, but it explained
<6% of their variation. Pollen donor diversity did not affect seed or fruit mass. Variation in seed and fruit mass
was explained by interplant variation (19%), intraplant variation among fruits (30%), and intrafruit variation
(50%). These results indicate that intra- and interplant sources, excluding pollen load and donor diversity but
possibly including environmental, architectural, and maternal effects, contribute to the substantial variation
observed in seed and fruit mass of senita cacti. Such variation may prove useful for plant recruitment under the
highly variable water- and nutrient-stressed conditions of desert environments.
Keywords: fruit, mass, maternal effects, pollen donor diversity, pollen load, pollen quality, seed, senita, size.
Introduction
Seed size can span six orders of magnitude, varying more

  

Source: Azevedo, Ricardo - Department of Biology and Biochemistry, University of Houston
Holland, J. Nathaniel - Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Rice University

 

Collections: Biology and Medicine; Environmental Sciences and Ecology