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Blockade of TNF receptor 1 reduces disease severity but increases parasite transmission during Plasmodium
 

Summary: Blockade of TNF receptor 1 reduces disease severity but
increases parasite transmission during Plasmodium
chabaudi chabaudi infection
GraŽinne H. Long a,b,*, Brian H.K. Chan a
, Judith E. Allen a
,
Andrew F. Read b
, Andrea L. Graham a
a
Institutes of Evolution, Immunology and Infection Research, School of Biological Sciences, University of Edinburgh, King's Buildings, West Mains
Road, Edinburgh EH9 3JT, Scotland, UK
b
Center for Infectious Disease Dynamics, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802, USA
Received 19 June 2007; received in revised form 21 November 2007; accepted 6 December 2007
Abstract
Reducing host carriage of transmission-stage malaria parasites (gametocytes) is expected to decrease the population-wide burden of
malaria. Some malaria disease severity is attributed to the induction of the pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-a and lymphotoxin-alpha
(LT-a), and we are interested in whether anti-malaria interventions which ameliorate the symptoms induced by those cytokines may have
the capacity to alter malaria transmission. As many functions of TNF-a and LT-a are exerted through TNF receptor 1 (TNFR1), we
investigated the effect TNFR1 blockade exerted on parasite transmission using the rodent malaria Plasmodium chabaudi chabaudi. We

  

Source: Allen, Judith - School of Biological Sciences, University of Edinburgh

 

Collections: Biology and Medicine