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The use of an interrogating ultrasound beam for noninvasive measurement of temperature has been investigated from several perspectives. Our group is
 

Summary: Abstract
The use of an interrogating ultrasound beam for noninvasive measurement of
temperature has been investigated from several perspectives. Our group is
looking at how the backscattered energy from individual scatterers changes with
temperature. By measuring the backscattered energy from a single ultrasound
beam (A-mode) in a tissue sample while changing the tissue temperature we have
gathered data from a minimum of 5 sites in several different tissue samples. We
have performed experiments on bovine liver and turkey breast. Changes in
backscattered energy appear to be consistent between the different types of
tissue. Typically we have seen a change of between 5 and 15 dB in backscattered
energy over the temperature range of 37 to 50 oC. The energy may either increase
or decrease with temperature depending on the type of scatterer that is being
followed. To follow the behavior of the signal from individual scatterers we have
segmented signals by hand. To automate the process we have segmented with
matched filters and with arbitrary segment intervals. The performance of both
methods was appears to be comparable to hand segmentation. The success of
these automatic methods suggests that changes in backscattered signals with
temperature can be tracked in real time over a variety of tissue types.
Goals
Compare different methods of tracking what appear to be individual scatterers in

  

Source: Arthur, R. Martin - Department of Electrical and Systems Engineering, Washington University in St. Louis

 

Collections: Biology and Medicine; Engineering