Home

About

Advanced Search

Browse by Discipline

Scientific Societies

E-print Alerts

Add E-prints

E-print Network
FAQHELPSITE MAPCONTACT US


  Advanced Search  

 
Distant Melodies: Statistical Learning of Nonadjacent Dependencies in Tone Sequences
 

Summary: Distant Melodies: Statistical Learning of Nonadjacent Dependencies in
Tone Sequences
Sarah C. Creel, Elissa L. Newport, and Richard N. Aslin
University of Rochester
Human listeners can keep track of statistical regularities among temporally adjacent elements in both
speech and musical streams. However, for speech streams, when statistical regularities occur among
nonadjacent elements, only certain types of patterns are acquired. Here, using musical tone sequences, the
authors investigate nonadjacent learning. When the elements were all similar in pitch range and timbre,
learners acquired moderate regularities among adjacent tones but did not acquire highly consistent
regularities among nonadjacent tones. However, when elements differed in pitch range or timbre, learners
acquired statistical regularities among the similar, but temporally nonadjacent, elements. Finally, with a
moderate grouping cue, both adjacent and nonadjacent statistics were learned, indicating that statistical
learning is governed not only by temporal adjacency but also by Gestalt principles of similarity.
How do listeners organize and learn a patterned sequence of
elements? Recent studies of a mechanism we have called statisti-
cal learning have shown that adults, young children, and infants
are capable of computing transitional probabilities among adjacent
syllables in rapidly presented streams of speech and of using these
statistics to group syllables into word-like units (Aslin, Saffran, &
Newport, 1998; Saffran, Aslin, & Newport, 1996; Saffran, New-

  

Source: Aslin, Richard N. - Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences, University of Rochester
DeAngelis, Gregory - Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences, University of Rochester

 

Collections: Biology and Medicine