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Interferometric synthetic aperture radar observations of the 1994 Double Spring Flat, Nevada, earthquake (M5.9)
 

Summary: Interferometric synthetic aperture radar observations of the 1994
Double Spring Flat, Nevada, earthquake (M5.9):
Main shock accompanied by triggered slip on a conjugate fault
Falk Amelung1
Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences, University of Miami, Florida, USA
John W. Bell
Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology, University of Nevada, Reno, Nevada, USA
Received 1 May 2002; revised 11 March 2003; accepted 29 April 2003; published 17 September 2003.
[1] The 1994 Double Spring Flat (DSF) earthquake (M5.9) was the largest earthquake to
strike Nevada in more than 30 years. It occurred in the Sierra Nevada-Basin and Range
Transition Zone within a step-over region between two major normal faults. Descending
and ascending ERS interferograms show a maximum range change of 8.5 cm which is
the coseismic ground displacement associated with this normal, oblique-slip, moderate-
sized earthquake. Elastic inverse modeling and surface displacements across coseismic
ground cracks suggest that two different event sources could account for the observed
deformation. The first source was the main shock with right-oblique slip on the north-
northwest striking DSF fault. The second source was normal faulting on a shallow, north-
northeast striking, elongated plane (conjugate to the DSF fault). These two sources are
consistent with the pattern of postevent seismicity, and we suggest that the second source
represents seismic and aseismic slip triggered by the main shock. Calculations of changes

  

Source: Amelung, Falk - Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences, University of Miami

 

Collections: Geosciences