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Ecology, 83(1), 2002, pp. 2127 2002 by the Ecological Society of America
 

Summary: 21
REPORTS
Ecology, 83(1), 2002, pp. 2127
2002 by the Ecological Society of America
NEGATIVE FREQUENCY DEPENDENCE AND
THE IMPORTANCE OF SPATIAL SCALE
JANE MOLOFSKY,1,5
JAMES D. BEVER,2
JANIS ANTONOVICS,3
AND TIMOTHY J. NEWMAN4
1Department of Botany, University of Vermont, Burlington, Vermont 05405 USA
2Department of Biology, Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana 47405 USA
3Biology Department, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia 22903-2477 USA
4Department of Physics, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia 22903-2477 USA
Abstract. Issues of spatial scale are inherent in many ecological systems. This study
uses a spatially explicit cellular automaton model to explore how the scale of dispersal
interacts with the scale and strength of negative frequency dependence to determine patterns
of species distribution. Counter to expectation, strong local frequency-dependent interac-
tions result in random spatial patterns. When dispersal scale and interaction scale are
decoupled, the resulting patterns are not necessarily random. For strong negative frequency

  

Source: Antonovics, Janis - Department of Biology, University of Virginia
Barrington, David - Department of Plant Biology, University of Vermont

 

Collections: Biology and Medicine