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Ecological Applications, 18(5), 2008, pp. 11711181 2008 by the Ecological Society of America
 

Summary: Ecological Applications, 18(5), 2008, pp. 1171­1181
Ó 2008 by the Ecological Society of America
ROLE OF PLANT ENEMIES IN THE FORESTRY OF INDIGENOUS
VS. NONINDIGENOUS PINES
MARIŽ A J. LOMBARDERO,1,3
PATRICIA VAŽ ZQUEZ-MEJUTO,1
AND MATTHEW P. AYRES
2
1
Departamento de ProduccioŽn Vegetal, Universidad de Santiago, 27002 Lugo, Spain
2
Department of Biological Sciences, Dartmouth College, Hanover, New Hampshire 03755 USA
Abstract. Plantations of rapidly growing trees are becoming increasingly common
because the high productivity can enhance local economies, support improvements in
educational systems, and generally improve the quality of life in rural communities.
Landowners frequently choose to plant nonindigenous species; one rationalization has been
that silvicultural productivity is enhanced when trees are separated from their native
herbivores and pathogens. The expectation of enemy reduction in nonindigenous species has
theoretical and empirical support from studies of the enemy release hypothesis (ERH) in the
context of invasion ecology, but its relevance to forestry has not been evaluated. We evaluated

  

Source: Ayres, Matthew.P. - Department of Biological Sciences, Dartmouth College

 

Collections: Environmental Sciences and Ecology