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Geophys. J. Int. (2009) doi: 10.1111/j.1365-246X.2009.04233.x GJISeismology
 

Summary: Geophys. J. Int. (2009) doi: 10.1111/j.1365-246X.2009.04233.x
GJISeismology
Source parameters and rupture velocity of small M 2.1 reservoir
induced earthquakes
J. Tomic,1
R. E. Abercrombie2
and A. F. do Nascimento3
1University of California, Los Angeles, Earth and Space Sciences, 595 Charles Young Dr., Los Angeles, CA 90095, USA. E-mail: tomic@moho.ess.ucla.edu
2Boston University, Earth Sciences Department, 675 Commonwealth Ave., Boston, MA 02215, USA
3Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte, Programa de P´os-Graduac¸~ao em Geodin^amica e Geof´isica, Campus Univerit´ario Lagoa Nova, Natal,
Caixa Postal 1596, RN 59078­970, Brazil
Accepted 2009 April 28. Received 2009 April 27; in original form 2006 October 24
S U M M A R Y
We calculate stress drop and rupture speed for ML 2.1 shallow reservoir induced earth-
quakes and find them to be similar to those of large, natural earthquakes. Previous studies have
suggested that hydrofractures, mining and reservoir-induced earthquakes have lower average
stress drop than natural tectonic earthquakes. This difference might result from the different
tectonic setting or the shallower hypocentral depths of induced earthquakes. Alternatively,
difficulties in correcting for attenuation and site effects in earlier studies may lead to un-
derestimation of stress drop. In addition, most studies assume the rupture velocity of small

  

Source: Abercrombie, Rachel E. - Department of Earth Sciences, Boston University

 

Collections: Geosciences