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Copyright 2000 by the Genetics Society of America Molecular Variation at the In(2L)t Proximal Breakpoint Site in Natural
 

Summary: Copyright 2000 by the Genetics Society of America
Molecular Variation at the In(2L)t Proximal Breakpoint Site in Natural
Populations of Drosophila melanogaster and D. simulans
Peter Andolfatto and Martin Kreitman
Committee on Genetics, Department of Ecology and Evolution, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637
Manuscript received May 8, 1999
Accepted for publication December 22, 1999
ABSTRACT
A previous study of nucleotide polymorphism in a Costa Rican population of Drosophila melanogaster
found evidence for a nonneutral deficiency in the number of haplotypes near the proximal breakpoint
of In(2L)t, a common inversion polymorphism in this species. Another striking feature of the data was a
window of unusually high nucleotide diversity spanning the breakpoint site. To distinguish between
selective and neutral demographic explanations for the observed patterns in the data, we sample alleles
from three additional populations of D. melanogaster and one population of D. simulans. We find that the
strength of associations among sites found at the breakpoint varies between populations of D. melanogaster. In
D. simulans, analysis of the homologous region reveals unusually elevated levels of nucleotide polymorphism
spanning the breakpoint site. As with American populations of D. melanogaster, our D. simulans sample
shows a marked reduction in the number of haplotypes but not in nucleotide diversity. Haplotype tests
reveal a significant deficiency in the number of haplotypes relative to the neutral expectation in the D.
simulans sample and some populations of D. melanogaster. At the breakpoint site, the level of divergence

  

Source: Andolfatto, Peter - Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Princeton University

 

Collections: Biology and Medicine