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10/18/2005 11:29 AMJournal of Vision -Local and global segmentation of rotating shapes viewed through multiple slits, by Anstis Page 1 of 12file:///Users/stuartanstis/Desktop/AnstisJOV2005.webarchive
 

Summary: 10/18/2005 11:29 AMJournal of Vision - Local and global segmentation of rotating shapes viewed through multiple slits, by Anstis
Page 1 of 12file:///Users/stuartanstis/Desktop/AnstisJOV2005.webarchive
Volume 5, Number 3, Article 4, Pages 194-201 doi:10.1167/5.3.4 http://journalofvision.org/5/3/4/ ISSN 1534-7362
Local and global segmentation of rotating shapes viewed
through multiple slits
Stuart Anstis Department of Psychology, UCSD, La Jolla, CA, USA
Abstract
Rotating outline squares and circles were viewed through a sunburst pattern of stationary radial slits. At slow rotation
rates the (dotted) square was perceived globally as a single rotating shape, and at higher rates, as a set of independent
local dots moving in and out radially. An eccentrically rotating circle was seen as a dotted circle; the dots comprising the
circle actually moved in and out along straight radial paths, but observers could never see this. Instead, they saw the
dots as running around the rim of the circle. The common motions were rejected, perhaps by subtracting the mean
motion of all points from each point. Only relative motion could be seen, and absolute dot motions were not available to
consciousness. Thus the visual motion system parsed patterns of absolute motion vectors into patterns of relative motion
vectors.
History
Received October 23, 2004; published March 8, 2005
Citation
Anstis, S. (2005). Local and global segmentation of rotating shapes viewed through multiple slits. Journal of Vision,
5(3), 194-201, http://journalofvision.org/5/3/4/, doi:10.1167/5.3.4.

  

Source: Anstis, Stuart - Department of Psychology, University of California at San Diego

 

Collections: Biology and Medicine