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Copyright 2000 by William F. Pratt. Published by Society for the Advancement of Material and Process Engineering with permission.
 

Summary: Copyright 2000 by William F. Pratt. Published by Society for the
Advancement of Material and Process Engineering with permission.
DESIGNING WITH WAVY COMPOSITES
Dr. William F. Pratt and Matthew S. Allen
Patterned Fiber Composites, Inc.
Lindon, UT 84042
Dr. C. Greg Jensen
Brigham Young University
Provo, UT 84602
ABSTRACT
Wavy composite is a new form of constrained layer damping that uses standard fibers, resins,
and viscoelastic materials to provide both high damping and stiffness. Wavy composites are used
to build lightweight structures with high inherent damping, and stiffness. Originally conceived in
1990 by Dr. Benjamin Dolgin of NASA, a practical way of implementing this concept did not
exist until 1997. During the period from 1997 to mid 2000 advances in FEA modeling and
prediction, material selection, and testing, led to a number of important discoveries related to
performance of these new materials that are covered in this article. Using damped wavy
composites it is now possible to fabricate structures with the stiffness of steel, the weight of
graphite composite, and unprecedented damping performance. Damping measurements as high
as 30% with standard graphite fiber are reported. Unlike conventional constrained layer

  

Source: Allen, Matthew S. - Department of Engineering Physics, University of Wisconsin at Madison

 

Collections: Engineering