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Ibis (2007), doi: 10.1111/j.1474-919x.2006.00621.x 2007 The Authors
 

Summary: Ibis (2007), doi: 10.1111/j.1474-919x.2006.00621.x
© 2007 The Authors
Journal compilation © 2007 British Ornithologists' Union
Blackwell Publishing Ltd
Temporal patterns of territory settlement and
detectability in mated and unmated Nightingales
Luscinia megarhynchos
VALENTIN AMRHEIN,1
* HANSJOERG P. KUNC,2
ROUVEN SCHMIDT2
& MARC NAGUIB2
1
Research Station Petite Camargue Alsacienne, University of Basel (Switzerland),
Rue de la Pisciculture, 68300 Saint-Louis, France
2
Department of Animal Behaviour, University of Bielefeld, 33501 Bielefeld, Germany
In many bird species the sex ratio of adults is male-biased,which is likely to have consequences
for the ecology as well as for the conservation of a species. For example, when some males
remain unpaired in a population, there should be strong selection on behavioural traits that
enhance pairing success. A surplus of males is also likely to have important implications

  

Source: Amrhein, Valentin - Zoologisches Institut, Universitšt Basel

 

Collections: Environmental Sciences and Ecology