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PERSONAL SPACE IN VIRTUAL REALITY Laurie M. Wilcox, Robert S. Allison, Samuel Elfassy and Cynthia Grelik
 

Summary: PERSONAL SPACE IN VIRTUAL REALITY
Laurie M. Wilcox, Robert S. Allison, Samuel Elfassy and Cynthia Grelik
York University,
Toronto, Ontario
Improving the sense of `presence' is a common goal of 3D display technology for film,
television and virtual reality. However, there are instances in which 3D presentation may
elicit unanticipated negative responses. For example, it is well established that violations of
interpersonal space cause discomfort in real-world situations. Here we ask if people respond
similarly when viewing life-sized stereoscopic images. Observers rated their level of
comfort in response to animate and inanimate objects in live and virtual (stereoscopic
projection) viewing conditions. Electrodermal activity was also recorded to monitor their
physiological response to these stimuli. Subjects exhibited significant negative reactions to
violations of interpersonal space in stereoscopic 3D displays, which were equivalent to those
experienced in the natural environment. These data have important implications for the
creation of 3D media and the use of virtual reality systems.
INTRODUCTION
Stereoscopic 3D display technology has increasingly
been employed for applications such as IMAXTM
theatres and immersive virtual reality systems such
as the CAVETM. Considerable research has been

  

Source: Allison, Robert - Department of Computer Science, York University (Toronto)

 

Collections: Computer Technologies and Information Sciences; Biology and Medicine