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n its continuous attempt to build intelligent artificial creatures, robotics has often been inspired by nature. Particularly interesting is the remarkable variety of light-
 

Summary: 2001
I
n its continuous attempt to build intelligent artificial creatures, robotics has often
been inspired by nature. Particularly interesting is the remarkable variety of light-
sensing structures and information processing strategies occurring in animal visual
systems. The physiology of these systems appears to have been influenced, through
evolution, by the ecological niche and lifestyle of each animal species. Insects such
as bees, ants, and flies have become a particularly appealing source of inspiration
because of the remarkable navigational capabilities they display, despite their relatively
restricted neural system. This, apparently, forced them to develop solutions to naviga-
tion tasks, which are ingenious in their simplicity and robust in their implementation,
both of which are invaluable characteristics for robotic systems.
The navigation task examined in this work is the centering behavior, which
consists of moving in the middle of a corridor-like environment. Bees are able to
accomplish similar tasks by exploiting three features of their visuo-motor sys-
tem: the wide field of view of their eyes, their ability to estimate retinal
motion, and a control mechanism that reorients their flight so that retinal
motion in the two eyes remains balanced [1].
Inspired by this biological solution, we attempt to create a reactive,
vision-based centering behavior for a nonholonomic mobile robot

  

Source: Argyros, Antonis - Foundation of Research and Technology, Hellas & Department of Computer Science, University of Crete
Trahanias, Panos - Institute of Computer Science, Foundation of Research and Technology, Hellas

 

Collections: Computer Technologies and Information Sciences