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Genet. Res., Camb. (1998), 71, pp. 193212. With 1 figure. Printed in the United Kingdom # 1998 Cambridge University Press 193 Evolution of animal genitalia: patterns of phenotypic and
 

Summary: Genet. Res., Camb. (1998), 71, pp. 193­212. With 1 figure. Printed in the United Kingdom # 1998 Cambridge University Press 193
Evolution of animal genitalia: patterns of phenotypic and
genotypic variation and condition dependence of genital
and non-genital morphology in water strider
(Heteroptera: Gerridae: Insecta)
GO= RAN ARNQVIST"* AND RANDY THORNHILL#
"Department of Animal Ecology, Uni ersity of Umeab , S-901 87 Umeab , Sweden
#Department of Biology, Uni ersity of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131-1091, USA
(Recei ed 29 September 1997 and in re ised form 27 January 1998)
Summary
Rapid and divergent evolution of male genitalia represents one of the most general evolutionary
patterns in animals with internal fertilization, but the causes of this evolutionary trend are poorly
understood. Several hypotheses have been proposed to account for genitalic evolution, most
prominent of which are the lock-and-key, sexual selection and pleiotropy hypotheses. However,
insights into the evolutionary mechanisms of genitalic evolution are hindered by a lack of relevant
in-depth studies of genital morphology. We used a biparental progenies breeding design to study
the effects of food stress during ontogeny on phenotypic expression of a suite of genital and non-
genital morphological traits, both linear traits and multivariate shape indices, in a natural
population of the water strider Gerris incognitus. In general, genitalic traits were as variable as
non-genital traits, both phenotypically and genotypically. Average narrow-sense heritability of

  

Source: Arnqvist, Göran - Department of Animal Ecology, Uppsala Universitet

 

Collections: Environmental Sciences and Ecology