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Journal of Tropical Ecology (2008) 24:351354. Copyright 2008 Cambridge University Press doi:10.1017/S0266467408005026 Printed in the United Kingdom
 

Summary: Journal of Tropical Ecology (2008) 24:351­354. Copyright © 2008 Cambridge University Press
doi:10.1017/S0266467408005026 Printed in the United Kingdom
SHORT COMMUNICATION
Host generalists dominate fungal communities associated with seeds
of four neotropical pioneer species
Courtney G. Kluger
, James W. Dalling, Rachel E. Gallery, Evelyn Sanchez,
Cheyenne Weeks-Galindo§ and A. Elizabeth Arnold#1
Duke University, Durham, NC 27708, USA
Department of Plant Biology, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61801, USA
Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute, Apartado 2072, Balboa, Panama
§ Pima College, Tucson, AZ 85745, USA
# Division of Plant Pathology and Microbiology, Department of Plant Sciences, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721, USA
(Accepted 10 March 2008)
Key Words: Ascomycota, Barro Colorado Island, Cecropia, diversity, endophytes, host specificity, pioneer trees, seed-
associated fungi
Most ecological studies of fungi associated with tropical
plants have focused on the rhizosphere or phyllosphere
of seedlings, saplings and adult trees (Augspurger 1983,
1984; Bell et al. 2006, Gilbert 2002, Gilbert et al. 2002,

  

Source: Arnold, A. Elizabeth - School of Plant Sciences, University of Arizona

 

Collections: Biology and Medicine