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Dominant-Negative CK2a Induces Potent Effects on Circadian Rhythmicity
 

Summary: Dominant-Negative CK2a Induces
Potent Effects on Circadian Rhythmicity
Elaine M. Smith1
, Jui-Ming Lin1
, Rose-Anne Meissner1,2
, Ravi Allada1*
1 Department of Neurobiology and Physiology, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois, United States of America, 2 Northwestern University Interdepartmental
Neuroscience Program, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois, United States of America
Circadian clocks organize the precise timing of cellular and behavioral events. In Drosophila, circadian clocks consist of
negative feedback loops in which the clock component PERIOD (PER) represses its own transcription. PER
phosphorylation is a critical step in timing the onset and termination of this feedback. The protein kinase CK2 has
been linked to circadian timing, but the importance of this contribution is unclear; it is not certain where and when CK2
acts to regulate circadian rhythms. To determine its temporal and spatial functions, a dominant negative mutant of the
catalytic alpha subunit, CK2aTik
, was targeted to circadian neurons. Behaviorally, CK2aTik
induces severe period
lengthening (;33 h), greater than nearly all known circadian mutant alleles, and abolishes detectable free-running
behavioral rhythmicity at high levels of expression. CK2aTik
, when targeted to a subset of pacemaker neurons,
generates period splitting, resulting in flies exhibiting both long and near 24-h periods. These behavioral effects are

  

Source: Allada, Ravi - Department of Neurobiology and Physiology, Northwestern University

 

Collections: Biology and Medicine