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Red sky at night: There are various explanations but the key is the fact that the sun rises in the East and weather tends to move in from
 

Summary: 1
2
Red sky at night: There are various explanations but the key is the
fact that the sun rises in the East and weather tends to move in from
the west in this country. The dusty atmosphere preferentially scatters
red light. As the sun sinks in the west, the direction that most of our
weather comes from, red sky at night suggests that a dry, dusty
airmass of broken cloud, symptomatic of favourable conditions, is
advancing. Conversely, red sky in the morning (the east) suggests
that the dry, dusty air is moving away. Like most laws, this is
statistical in the sense that it works more often than not.
3
Bill Foggitt, who died in 2004, utilised the sensitivity of the natural environment
to changes in the weather to produce forecasts. His forecasts for Yorkshire were
locally well respected. His forecasts relied on meticulous observations of both
the flora and fauna as well as meteorological conditions over many years.
Foggitt's reputation was assured in late 1985, when he publicly disputed a Met
Office prediction of a probable Arctic winter. Particularly interested in cold
snaps - he always believed that a new "little ice age" was imminent - he
described how he had seen a mole break surface through the snow, which meant

  

Source: Allan, Richard P. - Department of Meteorology, University of Reading

 

Collections: Geosciences