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The Center for Control, Dynamical Systems, and Computation University of California at Santa Barbara
 

Summary: The Center for Control, Dynamical Systems, and Computation
University of California at Santa Barbara
Fall 2008 Systems Biology
Seminar Series Presents
Feedback Between Mechanical Stress and Physiology in Bacterial Cell
Shape Determination
K.C. Huang
Stanford University
Tuesday, November 25, 2008 10:00-11:00am ESB 2001
Abstract:
Bacterial cells come in a wide variety of shapes and sizes, with the peptidoglycan cell wall as the
primary stress-bearing structure that dictates cell shape. In recent years, cell shape has been shown
to play a critical role in regulating many important biological functions including attachment, dispersal,
motility, polar differentiation, predation, and cellular differentiation. Though many molecular details of
the composition and assembly of the cell wall components are known, how the peptidoglycan network
organizes to give the cell shape during normal growth, and how it reorganizes in response to damage
or environmental forces have been relatively unexplored. We introduce a quantitative mechanical
model of the bacterial cell wall that predicts the response of cell shape to peptidoglycan damage in the
rod-shaped Gram-negative bacterium Escherichia coli. To test these predictions, we use time-lapse
imaging experiments to show that damage often manifests as a bulge on the sidewall, coupled to

  

Source: Akhmedov, Azer - Department of Mathematics, University of California at Santa Barbara

 

Collections: Mathematics