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Diamond and Related Materials 9 (2000) 236240 www.elsevier.com/locate/diamond
 

Summary: Diamond and Related Materials 9 (2000) 236240
www.elsevier.com/locate/diamond
The effect of nitrogen on competitive growth mechanisms
of diamond thin films
V.M. Ayres a,b,*, T.R. Bieler b, M.G. Kanatzidis c, J. Spano a, S. Hagopian a,
H. Balhareth a, B.F. Wright a, M. Farhan a, J. Abdul Majeed a, D. Spach a,
B.L. Wright a, J. Asmussen a
a Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824-1226, USA
b Department of Materials Science and Mechanics, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824-1226, USA
c Department of Chemistry, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824-1226, USA
Abstract
The correlation between surface morphology and texture (distribution of crystal orientations) has been analyzed to determine
how nitrogen provides a competitive growth advantage for the formation of 001 texture in diamond films. The film morphologies
were measured using TappingMode@ atomic force microscopy. Corresponding texture studies were performed using X-ray
diffraction with a four-circle goniometer to measure (111), (220) and (400) pole figures. Orientation distributions were generated
from the pole figures, from which inverse pole figures were made to quantify how texture was affected by process variables. After
2 h of growth, with and without nitrogen, similar textures were observed. With increasing time, nitrogen stimulates the growth of
orientations between 001 , 114 , and 104 . Without nitrogen, the majority orientation is 101 with a secondary component
near 113 . Examination of fracture surfaces indicates correlations with the observed texture and morphology changes. 2000
Elsevier Science S.A. All rights reserved.

  

Source: Ayres, Virginia - Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Michigan State University

 

Collections: Materials Science; Biology and Medicine