Home

About

Advanced Search

Browse by Discipline

Scientific Societies

E-print Alerts

Add E-prints

E-print Network
FAQHELPSITE MAPCONTACT US


  Advanced Search  

 
VOLUME 86, NUMBER 14 P H Y S I C A L R E V I E W L E T T E R S 2 APRIL 2001 Use of Surface-Wave Spectroscopy to Characterize Tilt Modes of a Vortex
 

Summary: VOLUME 86, NUMBER 14 P H Y S I C A L R E V I E W L E T T E R S 2 APRIL 2001
Use of Surface-Wave Spectroscopy to Characterize Tilt Modes of a Vortex
in a Bose-Einstein Condensate
P. C. Haljan, B. P. Anderson,* I. Coddington, and E. A. Cornell*
JILA, National Institute of Standards and Technology and Department of Physics, University of Colorado,
Boulder, Colorado 80309-0440
(Received 4 November 2000)
A vortex in a condensate in a nonspherical trapping potential will in general experience a torque. The
torque will induce tilting of the direction of the vortex axis. We observe this behavior experimentally and
show that by applying small distortions to the trapping potential, we can control the tilting behavior. By
suppressing vortex tilt, we have been able to hold the vortex axis along the line of sight for up to 15 sec.
Alternatively, we can induce a 180
tilt, effectively reversing the charge on the vortex as observed in the
lab frame. We characterize the vortex nondestructively with a surface-wave spectroscopic technique.
DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevLett.86.2922 PACS numbers: 03.75.Fi, 32.80.Pj, 67.57.Fg, 67.90.+z
The decay of "persistent" supercurrents, be they in su-
perfluids or superconductors, is intimately connected to the
dynamical behavior of vortices. A magnetically trapped,
gas-phase Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) provides a use-
ful laboratory for characterizing the microscopic behavior

  

Source: Anderson, Brian P. - Optical Sciences Center, University of Arizona

 

Collections: Physics