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It is further standardly assumed that that which projects is a presupposition. For an argument against1 identifying projection with (standard, classical) presuppositionality, see Roberts et. al. 2009. Chierchia and
 

Summary: It is further standardly assumed that that which projects is a presupposition. For an argument against1
identifying projection with (standard, classical) presuppositionality, see Roberts et. al. 2009. Chierchia and
McConnell-Ginet do not themselves make this assumption. They state that the test diagnoses
"backgroundedness of implications." (p.350)
1
A note on projection and local implication
Mandy Simons
Carnegie Mellon University
March 2010
1. Frege and Houdini: Two construals of projection
The phenomenon we now know as projection was first observed by Frege in his brief remarks about
presupposition in "Sense and Reference." Frege observes there that the assertion that Kepler died in misery
gives rise to the implication that the name Kepler has a referent; but that so too does the assertion that Kepler
did not die in misery. Here we have the source of the observation that if p is a presupposition of S, then p is
implied by (utterances of) S and by (utterances of) the negation of S.
Since Frege, it has been observed that those implications which are shared by a sentence S and by its
negation are also typically shared by a variety of other entailment-canceling embeddings of S: in questions,
in the antecedents of conditionals, and under epistemic possibility modals. This observation has entered the
canon in the form of the "family of sentences" test (Chierchia and McConnell-Ginet 2000). This test is
standardly used to demonstrate that some particular element of content projects. An application of the test1

  

Source: Andrews, Peter B. - Department of Mathematical Sciences, Carnegie Mellon University

 

Collections: Mathematics