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(This document was created 2003-Dec-31-09:36 in Vail, Colorado, and it was most recently altered (until this note was added) on 2004-Feb-01. It was submitted to Nature on 2004-Nov-14.
 

Summary: 1
(This document was created 2003-Dec-31-09:36 in Vail, Colorado, and it was most recently
altered (until this note was added) on 2004-Feb-01. It was submitted to Nature on 2004-Nov-14.
The word count was 2203, while the word count for "The mental Universe" is 1016.)
A Clearer Light
Richard Conn Henry
Human folk have historically looked to our intellectual leadershipour religious
leadersto understand the meaning of our lives, and the nature of our world. Many among us
still do today. But, with Galileo Galilei, a new element arrived. Galileo succeeded in believing
the unbelievable, regarding the physical world: "were it not for the existence of a superior and
better sense than natural and common sense to join forces with reason, I much question whether
I, too, should not have been much more recalcitrant toward the Copernican system than I have
been since a clearer light than usual has illuminated me." 1
But Galileo did much more than
simply himself succeeding in believing this impossibility: he succeeded in having you too
believe (and indeed nowadays effortlessly believe) that the Earth goes around the Sun. This was,
and remains, a stunning accomplishment in physics outreach.
So, with Galileo and then with Newton, religion was joined by physics in teaching us our
place in the universe and the nature of that universe. With the explosive growth of physics over
subsequent years it is hardly surprising that premature and very wrong conclusions were reached

  

Source: Henry, Richard C.- Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University

 

Collections: Physics