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2006 The Society for the Study of Evolution. All rights reserved. BOOK REVIEWS
 

Summary: 415
2006 The Society for the Study of Evolution. All rights reserved.
BOOK REVIEWS
Evolution, 60(2), 2006, pp. 415­417
SEXUAL TENSION: DOES CONFLICT LEAD TO COSTLY MATE CHOICE?1
MICHAEL D. JENNIONS
School of Botany and Zoology, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200, Australia
E-mail: michael.jennions@anu.edu.au
Received November 30, 2005.
Sexual Conflict is an enthusiastic introduction to sexually
antagonistic coevolution. This is not surprising given that the
authors are key promoters of its importance; however, their
treatment is also remarkably well balanced. They begin by
noting that although sexual conflict can be defined in many
ways, it always boils down to the same fact. Evolutionary
theory predicts that there are potential conflicts of interest
whenever genetically distinct entities interact. This is de-
monstrably true even for such seemingly cooperative ven-
tures as a mother feeding her child. Sexual reproduction of-
fers no exception because it requires two participants, and

  

Source: Arnqvist, Göran - Department of Animal Ecology, Uppsala Universitet
Higgie, Megan - School of Botany and Zoology, Australian National University
Rowe, Locke - Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Toronto

 

Collections: Biology and Medicine; Environmental Sciences and Ecology