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Network: Comput. Neural Syst. 11 (2000) 119129. Printed in the UK PII: S0954-898X(00)12938-0 Divisive inhibition in recurrent networks
 

Summary: Network: Comput. Neural Syst. 11 (2000) 119129. Printed in the UK PII: S0954-898X(00)12938-0
Divisive inhibition in recurrent networks
Frances S Chance and L F Abbott
Volen Center for Complex Systems and Department of Biology, Brandeis University, Waltham,
MA 02454-9110, USA
Received 8 July 1999, in final form 21 February 2000
Abstract. Models of visual cortex suggest that response selectivity can arise from recurrent
networks operating at high gain. However, such networks have a number of problematic features:
(i) they operate perilously close to a point of instability, (ii) small changes in synaptic strength can
dramatically modify the degree of amplification, and (iii) they respond slowly to rapidly changing
stimuli. Divisive inhibition, acting through interneurons that are themselves divisively inhibited,
can solve these problems without degrading the selectivity of a recurrent network.
1. Introduction
The extensive recurrent connectivity of cortical circuitry raises interesting questions about
the relative importance of recurrent and feedforward inputs in shaping the selectivity of
cortical neurons. Models of primary visual cortex have suggested that intracortical connections
generate the orientation tuning (Ben-Yishai et al 1995, Somers et al 1995, Sompolinsky and
Shapley 1997, Carandini and Ringach 1997) and direction selectivity (Douglas et al 1995,
Suarez et al 1995, Maex and Orban 1996) of simple cells, and the spatial-phase insensitivity
of complex cells (Chance et al 1999). These models rely on strong amplification of specific

  

Source: Abbott, Laurence - Center for Neurobiology and Behavior & Department of Physiology and Cellular Biophysics, Columbia University

 

Collections: Biology and Medicine