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A human complement receptor 1 polymorphism that reduces Plasmodium falciparum rosetting confers
 

Summary: A human complement receptor 1 polymorphism that
reduces Plasmodium falciparum rosetting confers
protection against severe malaria
Ian A. Cockburn*, Margaret J. Mackinnon*, Angela O'Donnell
, Stephen J. Allen
, Joann M. Moulds§
, Moses Baisor¶
,
Moses Bockarie¶
, John C. Reeder , and J. Alexandra Rowe*,
**
*Institute of Cell Animal and Population Biology, Ashworth Laboratories, King's Buildings, University of Edinburgh, West Mains Road, Edinburgh EH9 3JT,
United Kingdom; Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, John Radcliffe Hospital, Oxford OX3 9DS, United Kingdom; §Department of Microbiology
and Immunology, Drexel University College of Medicine, 2900 Queen Lane, Room G44, Philadelphia, PA 19129; ¶Papua New Guinea Institute of Medical
Research, P.O. Box 378, Yagaum MP 511, Papua New Guinea; and Papua New Guinea Institute of Medical Research, P.O. Box 60, Goroka EHP 441,
Papua New Guinea
Edited by Louis H. Miller, National Institutes of Health, Rockville, MD, and approved October 31, 2003 (received for review August 19, 2003)
Parasitized red blood cells (RBCs) from children suffering from
severe malaria often adhere to complement receptor 1 (CR1) on
uninfected RBCs to form clumps of cells known as ``rosettes.''

  

Source: Arnold, Jonathan - Nanoscale Science and Engineering Center & Department of Genetics, University of Georgia
Reece, Sarah - Institute of Immunology and Infection Research & School of Biological Sciences, University of Edinburgh

 

Collections: Biology and Medicine; Biotechnology; Environmental Sciences and Ecology