Home

About

Advanced Search

Browse by Discipline

Scientific Societies

E-print Alerts

Add E-prints

E-print Network
FAQHELPSITE MAPCONTACT US


  Advanced Search  

 
Ecology, 86(11), 2005, pp. 29682978 2005 by the Ecological Society of America
 

Summary: 2968
Ecology, 86(11), 2005, pp. 29682978
2005 by the Ecological Society of America
ECOLOGICAL COSTS AND BENEFITS OF DEFENSES IN NECTAR
LYNN S. ADLER1,2,5
AND REBECCA E. IRWIN3,4
1Department of Plant, Soil and Insect Sciences and Graduate Program in Organismic and Evolutionary Biology,
University of Massachusetts, Amherst, Massachusetts 01003 USA
2Department of Biology, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, Virginia 24061 USA
3Institute of Ecology, University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia 30602 USA
4Department of Biological Sciences, Dartmouth College, Hanover, New Hampshire 03755 USA
Abstract. The nectar of many plant species contains defensive compounds that have
been hypothesized to benefit plants through a variety of mechanisms. However, the rela-
tionship between nectar defenses and plant fitness has not been established for any species.
We experimentally manipulated gelsemine, the principal alkaloid of Carolina jessamine
(Gelsemium sempervirens), in nectar to determine its effect on pollinator visitation, nectar
robber visitation, and male and female plant reproduction. We found that nectar robbers
and most pollinators probed fewer flowers and spent less time per flower on plants with
high compared to low nectar alkaloids. High alkaloids decreased the donation of fluorescent
dye, an analogue of pollen used to estimate male plant reproduction, to neighboring plants

  

Source: Adler, Lynn - Department of Plant, Soil and Insect Sciences, University of Massachusetts at Amherst

 

Collections: Environmental Sciences and Ecology