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Behavioral/Systems/Cognitive Frequency-Selective Coding of Translation and Tilt in
 

Summary: Behavioral/Systems/Cognitive
Frequency-Selective Coding of Translation and Tilt in
Macaque Cerebellar Nodulus and Uvula
Tatyana Yakusheva,1
Pablo M. Blazquez,2
and Dora E. Angelaki1
Departments of 1
Neurobiology and 2
Otolaryngology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri 63110
Spatial orientation depends critically on the brain's ability to segregate linear acceleration signals arising from otolith afferents into
estimatesofself-motionandorientationrelativetogravity.Intheabsenceofvisualinformation,thisabilityisknowntodeteriorateatlow
frequencies. The cerebellar nodulus/uvula (NU) has been shown to participate in this computation, although its exact role remains
unclear. Here, we show that NU simple spike (SS) responses also exhibit a frequency dependent selectivity to self-motion (translation)
and spatial orientation (tilt). At 0.5 Hz, Purkinje cells encode three-dimensional translation and only weakly modulate during pitch and
rolltilt(0.4 0.05spikes/s//s).Butthisabilitytoselectivelysignaltranslationovertiltiscompromisedatlowerfrequencies,suchthatat
0.05 Hz tilt response gains average 2.0 0.3 spikes/s//s. We show that such frequency-dependent properties are attributable to an
incomplete cancellation of otolith-driven SS responses during tilt by a canal-driven signal coding angular position with a sensitivity of
3.9 0.3spikes/s/.Thisincompletecancellationisbroughtaboutbecauseotolith-drivenSSresponsesarealsopartiallyintegrated,thus
encodingcombinationsoflinearvelocityandacceleration.TheseresultsareconsistentwiththenotionthatNUSSmodulationrepresents
an internal neural representation of similar frequency dependencies seen in behavior.

  

Source: Angelaki, Dora - Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology, Washington University in St. Louis

 

Collections: Biology and Medicine