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Shifting continents, not behaviours: independent colonization of solitary and subsocial Anelosimus spider
 

Summary: Shifting continents, not behaviours: independent
colonization of solitary and subsocial Anelosimus spider
lineages on Madagascar (Araneae, Theridiidae)
INGI AGNARSSON, MATJAZ KUNTNER, JONATHAN A. CODDINGTON & TODD A. BLACKLEDGE
Submitted: 25 April 2009
Accepted: 12 August 2009
doi:10.1111/j.1463-6409.2009.00406.x
Agnarsson, I., Kuntner, M., Coddington, J. A. & Blackledge, T. A. (2010). Shifting
continents, not behaviours: independent colonization of solitary and subsocial Anelosimus
spider lineages on Madagascar (Araneae, Theridiidae). -- Zoologica Scripta, 39, 7587.
Madagascar is a biodiversity hotspot, thought to be colonized mostly via Cenozoic dis-
persal from Africa, followed by endemic radiation of multiple lineages. Anelosimus spiders
are diverse in Madagascar, and, like their congeners in the Americas, are most diverse in
wet montane forests. Most Anelosimus species are social in that they cooperate in web
building and prey capture either during a part of their life cycles (subsocial), including
hitherto studied Malagasy species, or permanently (quasisocial). One Central American
coastal species, Anelosimus pacificus, has secondarily switched to solitary living, and available
evidence suggests that its closest relatives from S. America and Europe are likely also soli-
tary. Here, we show that the only known coastal Anelosimus species in Madagascar and
Comoros Anelosimus decaryi and Anelosimus amelie sp. n. are also solitary. Using a phy-

  

Source: Agnarsson, Ingi - Department of Biology, Universidad de Puerto Rico

 

Collections: Biology and Medicine