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The origin of modern agglutinated foraminiferal assemblages: evidence from a stratified fjord
 

Summary: The origin of modern agglutinated foraminiferal
assemblages: evidence from a stratified fjord
John W. Murraya,*, Elisabeth Alveb
, Andrew Cundyc
a
School of Ocean and Earth Science, Southampton Oceanography Centre, European Way, Southampton SO14 3ZH, UK
b
Department of Geology, University of Oslo, PO Box 1047 Blindern, N0316 Oslo, Norway
c
School of Chemistry, Physics and Environmental Science, University of Sussex, Falmer, Brighton, BN1 9QJ, UK
Received 17 March 2003; accepted 4 June 2003
Abstract
Loch Etive, a silled 145 m deep fjord on the Scottish west coast, provides an example of modern benthic foraminiferal
assemblages at intermediate depths (i.e., below the intertidal zone and above the CCD) consisting almost exclusively of organic-
cemented agglutinated forms. Since such faunas from intermediate depths are rare in modern oceans but relatively common in the
fossil record, the present study allows new insights into one kind of ancient environment for which there are few modern analogues.
The strong dominance of agglutinated forms (both living and in some dead assemblages of foraminifera to the exclusion of
calcareous taxa) is attributed to the unusual oceanographic conditions. These include a combination of restricted deep-water
renewals and strong influence of freshwater which drains through large areas (relative to the size of the loch) of vegetated land. The
result is calm bottom water conditions with commonly occurring oxygen depletion (although not anoxic), brackish water

  

Source: Alve, Elisabeth - Department of Geosciences, Universitetet i Oslo

 

Collections: Geosciences