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Journal of Applied Ecology 2008 doi: 10.1111/j.1365-2664.2007.01435.x 2007 The Authors. Journal compilation 2007 British Ecological Society
 

Summary: Journal of Applied Ecology 2008 doi: 10.1111/j.1365-2664.2007.01435.x
© 2007 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2007 British Ecological Society
Blackwell Publishing Ltd
Top predators as indicators for species richness? Prey
species are just as useful
Tobias Roth1,2,3
* and Darius Weber1
1
Biodiversity Monitoring Switzerland, c/o Hintermann & Weber AG, Austrasse 2a, 4153 Reinach BL, Switzerland;
2
Research Station Petite Camargue Alsacienne, Rue de la Pisciculture, 68300 Saint-Louis, France; and 3
Zoological
Institute, University of Basel, Vesalgasse 1, 4051 Basel, Switzerland
Summary
1. The use of surrogates to identify protected areas is a common practice in conservation biology.
The use of top predators as surrogates has been criticized but recently a strong positive relationship
wasfoundbetweenthepresenceof toppredatorsandspeciesdiversityof severaltaxa.Asmentioned
by the authors, these striking results need to be assessed on a larger scale.
2. We used data from the Swiss Biodiversity Monitoring Programme and the Swiss breeding bird
survey to analyse the use of raptor species as a surrogate for plant, butterfly and bird species

  

Source: Amrhein, Valentin - Zoologisches Institut, Universitšt Basel

 

Collections: Environmental Sciences and Ecology