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Human Ecology, Vol. 32, No. 1, February 2004 ( C 2004) A Witness Tree Analysis of the Effects of Native
 

Summary: Human Ecology, Vol. 32, No. 1, February 2004 ( C 2004)
A Witness Tree Analysis of the Effects of Native
American Indians on the Pre-European Settlement
Forests in East-Central Alabama
H. Thomas Foster II,1,3
Bryan Black,2
and Marc D. Abrams2
Witness tree data from the southeastern United States (lat 33
30 N, long
86
30 W) were analyzed using catchment and distance analysis to quantify the
effects of Native American settlement on the composition of forest trees. Thirty
Creek Indian villages comprising 18 settlement catchments were included in
the sample, which is the largest Native American­forest interaction study using
witness trees to date. Lower frequencies of Pinus spp. were observed within
village catchments of the Coastal Plain and Ridge and Valley. Elevated fre-
quencies of early succession species were observed surrounding 2 km village
catchments. Distance analysis at two relatively isolated towns showed that
Pinus increases in frequency beyond 2000 m from villages while Carya had
the opposite result. Field and fruit species were more frequent within 6000 m of

  

Source: Abrams, Marc David - School of Forest Resources, Pennsylvania State University

 

Collections: Environmental Sciences and Ecology