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NATURE |VOL 408 |16 NOVEMBER 2000 |www.nature.com 325 Functional genomic analysis of
 

Summary: NATURE |VOL 408 |16 NOVEMBER 2000 |www.nature.com 325
articles
Functional genomic analysis of
C. elegans chromosome I by
systematic RNA interference
Andrew G. Fraser*▓, Ravi S. Kamath*▓, Peder Zipperlen*▓, Maruxa Martinez-Campos*, Marc Sohrmann│ & Julie Ahringer*
* Wellcome/CRC Institute, University of Cambridge, Tennis Court Road, CB2 1QR Cambridge, UK
│ The Sanger Centre, Wellcome Trust Genome Campus, Hinxton, Cambridge CB10 1SA, UK
▓ These authors contributed equally to this work
............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
Complete genomic sequence is known for two multicellular eukaryotes, the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans and the fruit »y
Drosophila melanogaster, and it will soon be known for humans. However, biological function has been assigned to only a small
proportion of the predicted genes in any animal. Here we have used RNA-mediated interference (RNAi) to target nearly 90% of
predicted genes on C. elegans chromosome I by feeding worms with bacteria that express double-stranded RNA. We have assigned
function to 13.9% of the genes analysed, increasing the number of sequenced genes with known phenotypes on chromosome I
from 70 to 378. Although most genes with sterile or embryonic lethal RNAi phenotypes are involved in basal cell metabolism, many
genes giving post-embryonic phenotypes have conserved sequences but unknown function. In addition, conserved genes are
signi«cantly more likely to have an RNAi phenotype than are genes with no conservation. We have constructed a reusable library of
bacterial clones that will permit unlimited RNAi screens in the future; this should help develop a more complete view of the
relationships between the genome, gene function and the environment.

  

Source: Ahringe, Julie - Wellcome Trust/Cancer Research UK Gurdon Institute, University of Cambridge

 

Collections: Biology and Medicine