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Consequences of Lexical Stress on Learning an Artificial Lexicon Sarah C. Creel, Michael K. Tanenhaus, and Richard N. Aslin
 

Summary: Consequences of Lexical Stress on Learning an Artificial Lexicon
Sarah C. Creel, Michael K. Tanenhaus, and Richard N. Aslin
University of Rochester
Four experiments examined effects of lexical stress on lexical access for recently learned words.
Participants learned artificial lexicons (48 words) containing phonologically similar items and were
tested on their knowledge in a 4-alternative forced-choice (4AFC) referent-selection task. Lexical stress
differences did not reduce confusions between cohort items: KAdazu and kaDAzeI were confused with
one another in a 4AFC task and in gaze fixations as often as BOsapeI and BOsapaI. However, lexical
stress did affect the relative likelihood of stress-initial confusions when words were embedded in running
nonsense speech. Words with medial stress, regardless of initial vowel quality, were more prone to
confusions than words with initial stress. The authors concluded that noninitial stress, particularly when
word segmentation is difficult, may serve as "noise" that alters lexical learning and lexical access.
Keywords: lexical stress, segmentation, artificial lexicon, cohort, rhyme
Accessing lexical representations in continuous speech presents
the listener with at least two challenges. The first is to segment the
acoustic input in order to identify the onsets of words, which,
unlike words in text, are not clearly marked. The second is to
match the segmented input against representations in memory in
order to retrieve information associated with the appropriate lex-
ical candidate. The literature investigating these issues has come to

  

Source: Aslin, Richard N. - Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences, University of Rochester
DeAngelis, Gregory - Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences, University of Rochester

 

Collections: Biology and Medicine