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CONCEPTS & SYNTHESIS EMPHASIZING NEW IDEAS TO STIMULATE RESEARCH IN ECOLOGY
 

Summary: 2568
CONCEPTS & SYNTHESIS
EMPHASIZING NEW IDEAS TO STIMULATE RESEARCH IN ECOLOGY
Ecology, 84(10), 2003, pp. 25682574
2003 by the Ecological Society of America
HOW VIRULENT SHOULD A PARASITE BE TO ITS VECTOR?
SAM L. ELLIOT,1,2,4
FREDERICK R. ADLER,3
AND MAURICE W. SABELIS1
1Section Population Biology, Institute for Biodiversity and Ecosystem Dynamics, Universiteit van Amsterdam,
Postbus 94084, 1090 GB Amsterdam, The Netherlands
2NERC Centre for Population Biology, Imperial College London, Silwood Park Campus, Ascot, Berkshire SL5 7PY, UK
3Department of Mathematics and Department of Biology, 155 South 1400 East, University of Utah, Salt Lake City,
Utah 84112-0090 USA
Abstract. Vector-borne parasites are commonly predicted to be less virulent to the
vector than to the definitive host as the parasite gains little by harming its main route of
transmission. Here we assess the empirical evidence from systems in which insects are
vectors for vertebrate, plant, and invertebrate parasites. The body of evidence supports
lower (but nonzero) parasite virulence to vectors than to plant or invertebrate hosts, but
not to vertebrate hosts. We consider why this might be by assessing evolutionarily stable

  

Source: Adler, Fred - Department of Mathematics, University of Utah

 

Collections: Environmental Sciences and Ecology