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vol. 159, no. 5 the american naturalist may 2002 Induction of Preference and Performance after Acclimation
 

Summary: vol. 159, no. 5 the american naturalist may 2002
Induction of Preference and Performance after Acclimation
to Novel Hosts in a Phytophagous Spider Mite:
Adaptive Plasticity?
Anurag A. Agrawal,* Filipa Vala, and Maurice W. Sabelis
Section of Population Biology, University of Amsterdam, Kruislaan
320, Amsterdam 1098 SM, The Netherlands
Submitted November 9, 2000; Accepted October 29, 2001
abstract: We examined induction of preference and performance
on novel host plants for two laboratory populations of the polyph-
agous spider mite Tetranychus urticae, with one population adapted
to bean and the other population adapted to tomato. We bred four
isofemale lines of the bean population only and used them in all the
assays. The bean population had a 30% lower fecundity on tomato
than on bean, while the tomato population had equal fecundity on
both host plants. Acclimation of adult females to the novel host plant
for both populations increased acceptability of that novel host but
did not increase rejection of the original host. The bean population
experienced a 60% benefit and a 30% cost in terms of egg production
for acclimating to tomato, thus exemplifying adaptive plasticity. The

  

Source: Agrawal, Anurag - Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology & Entomollogy, Cornell University

 

Collections: Environmental Sciences and Ecology