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TRENDS in Cognitive Sciences Vol.5 No.1 January 2001 http://tics.trends.com 1364-6613/01/$ see front matter 2001 Elsevier Science Ltd.All rights reserved. PII: S1364-6613(00)01567-9
 

Summary: TRENDS in Cognitive Sciences Vol.5 No.1 January 2001
http://tics.trends.com 1364-6613/01/$ see front matter 2001 Elsevier Science Ltd.All rights reserved. PII: S1364-6613(00)01567-9
10 OpinionOpinion
The brain is a powerful decision-maker, able to form
judgments about issues as simple as whether a sensory
stimulus is present to those as complex as what career
to choose or whom to marry. How are these judgments
formed? Decision analysis in such diverse fields as
biology, computer science, economics, political science
and psychology has provided valuable insights into
which factors are taken into account and how those
factors are combined to form a decision13. However,
because these insights are derived from behavior, they
are inherently limited in terms of their ability to reveal
the inner workings of the brain during decision
formation. To achieve this level of understanding,
investigators have begun to measure neural activity in
subjects, usually monkeys, performing perceptual
tasks that require decision formation (see Fig. 1 for an
example of this kind of task). The aim of this article is

  

Source: Andrzejak, Ralph Gregor - Departament de Tecnologia, Universitat Pompeu Fabra
Shadlen, Michael - Department of Physiology and Biophysics, University of Washington at Seattle

 

Collections: Biology and Medicine; Computer Technologies and Information Sciences