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The following text was originally produced in 1988 by Achsah Carrier and Christina Lujan for a brochure for the International Center's 15th Anniversary celebration, and revised in 1993 by James Cooper. Funds for this project
 

Summary: The following text was originally produced in 1988 by Achsah Carrier and Christina Lujan for a brochure for the
International Center's 15th Anniversary celebration, and revised in 1993 by James Cooper. Funds for this project
were provided by the Office of the Vice President for Student Affairs.
A History of 21 University Circle and the International Center
Original architect's drawing
The International Center has been open at 21 University Circle since 1972. The Center's many guests and visitors often
ask about the house and its history, for it is indeed a lovely building and a perfect setting for the Center.
The house was originally built in 1914 for Mrs. W. A. L. Trotter and her children by the notable Charlottesville architect
Eugene Bradbury. He practiced in Charlottesville from 1907 to 1927 and built many distinguished houses in the area,
including the house for General Kearney on Lewis Mountain. The Kearney house is easily seen from the city today and is
often mistaken by newcomers for Monticello. Bradbury also built two other houses on the street, at 20 and at 1835
University Circle.
The street numbers of these three neighboring houses are confusing, as indeed are the street numbers around the
Circle, a fact that bedevils every visitor. This confusion began when a city official decided that University Circle was
really properly 18th Street and that all the street numbers should begin with the number eighteen. Some circle
residents went along with this officiousness, but many preferred their old one-and two-digit numbers and simply
refused to change. So the International Center at 21 University Circle has 1841 on one side, 26 on the other and 20
across the street.
In 1934, three sisters, Rosalie and Janet Thornton, and Mrs. Carter Thermon, bought the Trotter's house in preparation
for their retirements. Their father named it "The Terraces," after one of its most notable features, the gardens that

  

Source: Acton, Scott - Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Virginia

 

Collections: Computer Technologies and Information Sciences