Home

About

Advanced Search

Browse by Discipline

Scientific Societies

E-print Alerts

Add E-prints

E-print Network
FAQHELPSITE MAPCONTACT US


  Advanced Search  

 
Copyright 1994 Psychonomic Society, Inc. 644 This research was supported by Grant MH32307 and Research Sci-
 

Summary: Copyright 1994 Psychonomic Society, Inc. 644
This research was supported by Grant MH32307 and Research Sci-
entist Award MH00902 from the National Institute of Mental Health
to C.R.-C. Earlier portions of these data were presented at the meet-
ing of the Eastern Psychological Association, New York, April 1992.
We thank George Collier for critical comments on an earlier version
of the manuscript. Address correspondence and requests for reprints
to the first author at the Department of Psychology, Busch Campus,
Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ 08903.
Substituting new details for old?
Effects of delaying postevent information
on infant memory
CAROLYN ROVEE-COLLIER, SCOTT A. ADLER, and MARGARET A. BORZA
Rutgers University, New Brunswick, New Jersey
How that which we remember is selectively distorted by new information was studied in 3-month-
old infants who learned to move a particular crib mobile by operant foot kicking. Infants who were
passively exposed to a novel mobile 1, 2, or 3 days later subsequently treated the novel mobile as if
they had actually been trained with it. Also, after the longest exposure delay, they no longer recog-
nized the original mobile. Likewise, when the novel mobile was exposed after the longest delay, it
could prime the forgotten training memory in a reactivation paradigm, but the original mobile no

  

Source: Adler, Scott A. - Centre for Vision Research & Department of Psychology, York University (Toronto)

 

Collections: Biology and Medicine