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ORIGINAL ARTICLE doi:10.1111/j.1558-5646.2010.01176.x
 

Summary: ORIGINAL ARTICLE
doi:10.1111/j.1558-5646.2010.01176.x
A STRATEGY TO INCREASE COOPERATION
IN THE VOLUNTEER'S DILEMMA: REDUCING
VIGILANCE IMPROVES ALARM CALLS
Marco Archetti1,2,3
1
Department of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology, Harvard University, 26 Oxford Street, Cambridge,
Massachusetts 02138
2
Faculty of Business and Economics, University of Basel, Peter Merian-Weg 6, 4002 Basel, Switzerland
3
E-mail: archetti@fas.harvard.edu
Received July 27, 2010
Accepted October 14, 2010
One of the most common examples of cooperation in animal societies is giving the alarm in the presence of a predator. A reduction
in individual vigilance against predators when group size increases (the "group size effect") is one of the most frequently reported
relationships in the study of animal behavior, and is thought to be due to relaxed selection, either because more individuals can
detect the predator more easily (the "many eyes" effect) or because the risk of predator attack is diluted on more individuals (the
"selfish herd" effect). I show that these hypotheses are not theoretically grounded: because everybody relies on someone else to

  

Source: Archetti, Marco - Department of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology, Harvard University

 

Collections: Biology and Medicine