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Issues in TCP Vegas Richard J. La, Jean Walrand, and Venkat Anantharam
 

Summary: Issues in TCP Vegas
Richard J. La, Jean Walrand, and Venkat Anantharam
Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences
University of California at Berkeley
{hyongla, wlr, ananth}@eecs.berkeley.edu
1 Introduction
The Transmission Control Protocol (TCP) was first proposed and implemented to prevent the
future congestion collapses after the congestion collapses in 1986. Since then, it has gone through
several phases of improvement, and many new features such as fast retransmit and fast recovery
have been added.
Recently Brakmo et al. [2] have proposed a new version of TCP, which is named TCP Vegas,
with a fundamentally different congestion avoidance scheme from that of TCP Reno and claimed
that TCP Vegas achieves 37 to 71 percent higher throughput than TCP Reno. Ahn et al. [1]
have evaluated the performance of TCP Vegas on their wide area emulator and shown that TCP
Vegas does achieve higher efficiency than TCP Reno and causes much less packet retransmissions.
However, they have observed that TCP Vegas when competing with other TCP Reno connections,
does not receive a fair share of bandwidth, i.e., TCP Reno connections receive about 50 percent
higher bandwidth. This incompatibility property is analyzed also by Mo et al. [6]. They show that
due to the aggressive nature of TCP Reno, when the buffer sizes are large, TCP Vegas loses to
TCP Reno that fills up the available buffer space, forcing TCP Vegas to back off.

  

Source: Anantharam, Venkat - Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences, University of California at Berkeley
La, Richard J. - Institute for Systems Research & Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Maryland at College Park

 

Collections: Computer Technologies and Information Sciences; Engineering