Home

About

Advanced Search

Browse by Discipline

Scientific Societies

E-print Alerts

Add E-prints

E-print Network
FAQHELPSITE MAPCONTACT US


  Advanced Search  

 
Evidence for power-law frequency dependence of intrinsic dielectric response in the CaCu3Ti4O12 Alexander Tselev,* Charles M. Brooks, and Steven M. Anlage
 

Summary: Evidence for power-law frequency dependence of intrinsic dielectric response in the CaCu3Ti4O12
Alexander Tselev,* Charles M. Brooks, and Steven M. Anlage
Center for Superconductivity Research, Department of Physics, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742-4111, USA
Haimei Zheng and Lourdes Salamanca-Riba
Department of Materials and Nuclear Engineering, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742-2115, USA
R. Ramesh
Department of Materials and Nuclear Engineering and Department of Physics, University of Maryland, College Park,
Maryland 20742-2115, USA
M. A. Subramanian
DuPont Central Research and Development, Experimental Station, Wilmington, Delaware 19880-0328, USA
(Received 17 November 2003; revised manuscript received 17 May 2004; published 4 October 2004)
We investigated the dielectric response of CaCu3Ti4O12 (CCTO) thin films grown epitaxially on LaAlO3
(001) substrates by pulsed laser deposition. The dielectric response of the films was found to be strongly
dominated by a power law in frequency, typical of materials with localized hopping charge carriers, in contrast
to the Debye-like response of the bulk material. The film conductivity decreases with annealing in oxygen, and
it suggests that oxygen deficit is a cause of the relatively high film conductivity. With increase of the oxygen
content, the room temperature frequency response of the CCTO thin films changes from the response indicat-
ing the presence of some relatively low conducting capacitive layers to purely power law, and then toward a
frequency independent response with a relative dielectric constant 102
. The film conductance and dielec-

  

Source: Anlage, Steven - Center for Superconductivity Research & Department of Physics, University of Maryland at College Park

 

Collections: Materials Science